Ency Department visits, 200,000 deaths and 16.7 billion in medical expenditures annually. [2,3,4] A

Ency Department visits, 200,000 deaths and 16.7 billion in medical expenditures annually. [2,3,4] A prior study highlights the presence of regional variations in US sepsis mortality. [5]. Over the last century, the most significant public health gains in the United States have resulted from evidence-based risk stratification, detection and reduction efforts for common medical conditions such as cardiovascular disease and stroke. [6,7,8] Despite the national importance of the condition, progress at reducing the public health impact of sepsis has been relativelylimited. A potential explanation is that current scientific and clinical initiatives tend to focus upon the acute care of sepsis after the onset of disease. Despite the presence of plausible pathophysiologic pathways as well as prevention and risk reduction strategies, few efforts have conceptualized sepsis as a predictable or preventable condition. [9,10]. The first step in devising disease risk stratification or prevention strategies is to identify the characteristics of individuals at increased risk of developing the illness. A suitable design for characterizing the risk factors associated with sepsis is a population-based cohort with baseline information on each individual coupled with prospective longitudinal surveillance for incident sepsis events. [11] The Reasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study is one of the nation’s largest ongoing longitudinal cohort studies, encompassing 30,239 community-dwelling participants across the US. [12] TheChronic Medical Conditions and Risk of Sepsisobjective of this study was to describe the associations between baseline chronic medical conditions and future risk of sepsis in the REGARDS cohort.Methods Ethics StatementThis study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the University of Alabama at Birmingham.Study DesignThe study utilized a population-based longitudinal cohort design using the national REGARDS cohort.The REGARDS CohortThe REGARDS study is one of the largest ongoing national cohorts of community-dwelling individuals in the US. [12] Designed to evaluate geographic and black-white stroke mortality variations, REGARDS includes 30,239 individuals 45 years old from across the United States. REGARDS encompasses representation from all regions of the continental US. Participant representation emphasizes the Southeastern US, with 20 of the cohort originating from the coastal plains of North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, and 30 originating from the remainder of North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia plus Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana and Arkansas. The cohort includes 41 African Americans, 45 men, and 69 individuals over 60 years old. The cohort does not include Hispanics. REGARDS obtained baseline information on each participant from structured interviews and in-home visits. Baseline data for each participant include physical characteristics (height, weight), physiology (blood pressure, pulse, electrocardiogram), diet, family history, psychosocial factors and prior residences. The study also obtained biological specimens (blood, urine, etc.). On a semiannual basis, the study contacts each participant to determine the date, location and attributed SR3029 web reason for all hospitalizations MedChemExpress Linolenic acid methyl ester during the prior 6 months. If the participant has died, the study team interviewed proxies to ascertain the circumstances of the participant’s death. Follow-up on participants in this manner.Ency Department visits, 200,000 deaths and 16.7 billion in medical expenditures annually. [2,3,4] A prior study highlights the presence of regional variations in US sepsis mortality. [5]. Over the last century, the most significant public health gains in the United States have resulted from evidence-based risk stratification, detection and reduction efforts for common medical conditions such as cardiovascular disease and stroke. [6,7,8] Despite the national importance of the condition, progress at reducing the public health impact of sepsis has been relativelylimited. A potential explanation is that current scientific and clinical initiatives tend to focus upon the acute care of sepsis after the onset of disease. Despite the presence of plausible pathophysiologic pathways as well as prevention and risk reduction strategies, few efforts have conceptualized sepsis as a predictable or preventable condition. [9,10]. The first step in devising disease risk stratification or prevention strategies is to identify the characteristics of individuals at increased risk of developing the illness. A suitable design for characterizing the risk factors associated with sepsis is a population-based cohort with baseline information on each individual coupled with prospective longitudinal surveillance for incident sepsis events. [11] The Reasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study is one of the nation’s largest ongoing longitudinal cohort studies, encompassing 30,239 community-dwelling participants across the US. [12] TheChronic Medical Conditions and Risk of Sepsisobjective of this study was to describe the associations between baseline chronic medical conditions and future risk of sepsis in the REGARDS cohort.Methods Ethics StatementThis study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the University of Alabama at Birmingham.Study DesignThe study utilized a population-based longitudinal cohort design using the national REGARDS cohort.The REGARDS CohortThe REGARDS study is one of the largest ongoing national cohorts of community-dwelling individuals in the US. [12] Designed to evaluate geographic and black-white stroke mortality variations, REGARDS includes 30,239 individuals 45 years old from across the United States. REGARDS encompasses representation from all regions of the continental US. Participant representation emphasizes the Southeastern US, with 20 of the cohort originating from the coastal plains of North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, and 30 originating from the remainder of North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia plus Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana and Arkansas. The cohort includes 41 African Americans, 45 men, and 69 individuals over 60 years old. The cohort does not include Hispanics. REGARDS obtained baseline information on each participant from structured interviews and in-home visits. Baseline data for each participant include physical characteristics (height, weight), physiology (blood pressure, pulse, electrocardiogram), diet, family history, psychosocial factors and prior residences. The study also obtained biological specimens (blood, urine, etc.). On a semiannual basis, the study contacts each participant to determine the date, location and attributed reason for all hospitalizations during the prior 6 months. If the participant has died, the study team interviewed proxies to ascertain the circumstances of the participant’s death. Follow-up on participants in this manner.

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