Hould be evaluated based on experiences from other programmes to avoid

Hould be evaluated based on experiences from other programmes to avoid some of the common pitfalls that occur when programme ideas are translated into practice. The merit of task-shifting interventions should be adjudged relative to the potential impact for patients and health workers in neonatal nurseries, as well as the Kenyan health system overall. Research arising from the HSD-N project can fill in some of the knowledge gaps in qualitative research around task shifting and patients’ experiences with healthcare in sub-Saharan Africa.Relevance to clinical practiceTask shifting is typically thought of by managers as a tool to lower costs of, or expand access to care. Ideally, this happens with no diminution in quality. It is becoming an attractive L 663536 solubility CyclopamineMedChemExpress Cyclopamine policy option globally particularly perhaps in low-income settings where attention has been paid to effectiveness of task shifting through community or lay health workers ?areas that have been the subject of both quantitative and qualitative systematic literature reviews. However, there have been limited efforts to explore how task shifting impacts on services and the roles of existing health professionals from the perspective of these health professionals. This systematic review highlights potentially valid concerns of health workers about `mission creep’ of new cadres, and about how their own roles may change, as well as their recognition of potential benefits. The findings have importance for the design of task-shifting approaches that are acceptable to and truly complement the work of existing health professionals.?2016 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Nursing Published by John Wiley Sons Ltd. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 25, 2083?H Mijovic et al.AcknowledgementsThis research was conducted while Hana Mijovic was an MSc. student at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine where she was supervised by Jacob McKnight.FundingThis work was supported by the funds from The Wellcome Trust (#097170) awarded to ME for a Senior Fellowship together with an Oxford University / Wellcome Trust Institutional Strategic Support Fund award and a Joint Funded Health Systems Research Initiatives grant (MR/M015386/ 1). The funders had no role in drafting or submitting this manuscript.ContributionsHM, JM and ME contributed to study design and manuscript preparation. HM and JM conducted data collection and analysis.
Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is defined as an intermediate cognitive state between normal aging and dementia. Those with MCI have an elevated risk of developing dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease and other conditions (Petersen et al., 2009). They may already be experiencing subtle difficulties in everyday functioning (Hughes et al., 2012), have substantial depressive symptoms (Apostolova and Cummings, 2008), and impairments in gait and balance (Montero-Odasso et al., 2012). MCI may provide an optimal window for preventive interventions as previous research suggests the presence of cognitive plasticity, and there are preliminary findings of cognitive benefit from cognitive interventions targeting those with MCI (Simon et al., 2012). A large body of evidence suggests that older adults who are more engaged in mentally and socially stimulating leisure activities have better cognitive health compared to less engaged peers (Hertzog et al., 2009). According to the engagement hypothesis, the “substantive complexity” of engagement is characterized by a diversity of stimuli, large numbers of deci.Hould be evaluated based on experiences from other programmes to avoid some of the common pitfalls that occur when programme ideas are translated into practice. The merit of task-shifting interventions should be adjudged relative to the potential impact for patients and health workers in neonatal nurseries, as well as the Kenyan health system overall. Research arising from the HSD-N project can fill in some of the knowledge gaps in qualitative research around task shifting and patients’ experiences with healthcare in sub-Saharan Africa.Relevance to clinical practiceTask shifting is typically thought of by managers as a tool to lower costs of, or expand access to care. Ideally, this happens with no diminution in quality. It is becoming an attractive policy option globally particularly perhaps in low-income settings where attention has been paid to effectiveness of task shifting through community or lay health workers ?areas that have been the subject of both quantitative and qualitative systematic literature reviews. However, there have been limited efforts to explore how task shifting impacts on services and the roles of existing health professionals from the perspective of these health professionals. This systematic review highlights potentially valid concerns of health workers about `mission creep’ of new cadres, and about how their own roles may change, as well as their recognition of potential benefits. The findings have importance for the design of task-shifting approaches that are acceptable to and truly complement the work of existing health professionals.?2016 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Nursing Published by John Wiley Sons Ltd. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 25, 2083?H Mijovic et al.AcknowledgementsThis research was conducted while Hana Mijovic was an MSc. student at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine where she was supervised by Jacob McKnight.FundingThis work was supported by the funds from The Wellcome Trust (#097170) awarded to ME for a Senior Fellowship together with an Oxford University / Wellcome Trust Institutional Strategic Support Fund award and a Joint Funded Health Systems Research Initiatives grant (MR/M015386/ 1). The funders had no role in drafting or submitting this manuscript.ContributionsHM, JM and ME contributed to study design and manuscript preparation. HM and JM conducted data collection and analysis.
Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is defined as an intermediate cognitive state between normal aging and dementia. Those with MCI have an elevated risk of developing dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease and other conditions (Petersen et al., 2009). They may already be experiencing subtle difficulties in everyday functioning (Hughes et al., 2012), have substantial depressive symptoms (Apostolova and Cummings, 2008), and impairments in gait and balance (Montero-Odasso et al., 2012). MCI may provide an optimal window for preventive interventions as previous research suggests the presence of cognitive plasticity, and there are preliminary findings of cognitive benefit from cognitive interventions targeting those with MCI (Simon et al., 2012). A large body of evidence suggests that older adults who are more engaged in mentally and socially stimulating leisure activities have better cognitive health compared to less engaged peers (Hertzog et al., 2009). According to the engagement hypothesis, the “substantive complexity” of engagement is characterized by a diversity of stimuli, large numbers of deci.

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