Er installation how much progress she had made with her search

Er installation how much progress she had made with her search for information, psychological counseling and work on her `body image’ (A#3). Interpreting the images and objects reinforced the women’s reflective competencies and rendered profoundly personal insights. The art forms are renderings of the women’s thoughts and feelings fixed at a particular point in time. Reminded of that time when their art forms were first created, one woman commented on changes that have ensued over the many months since the workshops. `When I, I look back at my collage … I can see that where I was at when we first had our workshops and I made the collage … it’s quite different from where I am now’ (V#3). A closing activity of the workshops was an invitation to reflect on the group creations, with the women offering one word in turn that matched their mood304 ?2014 Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 1477-8211 Social Theory Health Vol. 12, 3, 291?Aesthetic rationality of the popular expressive artsand their name (the first letter of the word was to be the same as that of their first name). In the follow-up interview, one woman, commenting on her surprise on her word choice, stated I felt, like really joyful … it’s that maybe I can share some ideas that might help someone else and that felt really good … . So that, and that vehicle at the play, NecrosulfonamideMedChemExpress Necrosulfonamide because I’m, not that I ever wanted to do any acting but I do appreciate, you know, the umm the creative arts, so I see that as a good way of sharing information that I would connect with, you know through the arts and umm so in that way it was a good match for me. So I felt really happy after …. . I felt great … . Because when we went around and we had to say a word … . And I said joyful! And I really meant it, it felt good. (A#2) Habermas characterizes the arts as the cultural resources for a society to interpret itself. Yet, he holds reservations about the role of the aesthetic-expressive domain in the emancipatory project because those particular validity claims cannot command universal inter-subjective agreement unless they are first articulated in the form of art criticism for public debate. Only through public criticism can art work `point to the context-transcending force of the implied claim of the work through the decentred and unbounded character of the subjectivity promoted by the aesthetic experience’ (Boucher, 2011, p. 73). Even with widespread public debate, because aesthetic claims reflect our innermost feelings and needs, it is not easy to see that they can ever be universally binding. In line with Ingram (1991), we argue that the generalizability requirement for aesthetic claims can be softened to domains of shared applicability without losing the force of communicative rationality, since `a Stattic site person who makes an aesthetic judgment does not presume that ALL rational persons would consent to it’ (p. 82). Instead, aesthetic claims can be rationally justified in terms of the value standards of a given group whose members intersubjectively share the same lifeworld. Generalizable interests within the context of the project were located in a series of concentric circles of applicability. In the initial workshops, the expressive arts knit together a small survivor group (7) through the opportunity to discuss issues with one another and even to consider differences. Already in the first workshop, the concerns of these group members quickly extended to include other survivors beyond who regularly confro.Er installation how much progress she had made with her search for information, psychological counseling and work on her `body image’ (A#3). Interpreting the images and objects reinforced the women’s reflective competencies and rendered profoundly personal insights. The art forms are renderings of the women’s thoughts and feelings fixed at a particular point in time. Reminded of that time when their art forms were first created, one woman commented on changes that have ensued over the many months since the workshops. `When I, I look back at my collage … I can see that where I was at when we first had our workshops and I made the collage … it’s quite different from where I am now’ (V#3). A closing activity of the workshops was an invitation to reflect on the group creations, with the women offering one word in turn that matched their mood304 ?2014 Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 1477-8211 Social Theory Health Vol. 12, 3, 291?Aesthetic rationality of the popular expressive artsand their name (the first letter of the word was to be the same as that of their first name). In the follow-up interview, one woman, commenting on her surprise on her word choice, stated I felt, like really joyful … it’s that maybe I can share some ideas that might help someone else and that felt really good … . So that, and that vehicle at the play, because I’m, not that I ever wanted to do any acting but I do appreciate, you know, the umm the creative arts, so I see that as a good way of sharing information that I would connect with, you know through the arts and umm so in that way it was a good match for me. So I felt really happy after …. . I felt great … . Because when we went around and we had to say a word … . And I said joyful! And I really meant it, it felt good. (A#2) Habermas characterizes the arts as the cultural resources for a society to interpret itself. Yet, he holds reservations about the role of the aesthetic-expressive domain in the emancipatory project because those particular validity claims cannot command universal inter-subjective agreement unless they are first articulated in the form of art criticism for public debate. Only through public criticism can art work `point to the context-transcending force of the implied claim of the work through the decentred and unbounded character of the subjectivity promoted by the aesthetic experience’ (Boucher, 2011, p. 73). Even with widespread public debate, because aesthetic claims reflect our innermost feelings and needs, it is not easy to see that they can ever be universally binding. In line with Ingram (1991), we argue that the generalizability requirement for aesthetic claims can be softened to domains of shared applicability without losing the force of communicative rationality, since `a person who makes an aesthetic judgment does not presume that ALL rational persons would consent to it’ (p. 82). Instead, aesthetic claims can be rationally justified in terms of the value standards of a given group whose members intersubjectively share the same lifeworld. Generalizable interests within the context of the project were located in a series of concentric circles of applicability. In the initial workshops, the expressive arts knit together a small survivor group (7) through the opportunity to discuss issues with one another and even to consider differences. Already in the first workshop, the concerns of these group members quickly extended to include other survivors beyond who regularly confro.

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