Nt the disturbing, frightening, mystifying discourse of medical reports. In the

Nt the disturbing, frightening, mystifying discourse of medical reports. In the second stage of the project, during which the ethnodrama was performed, the concentric domains of the shared lifeworld extended to audiences comprising health-care providers. Early in the group’s development, the seven women expressed their collective need to enlighten medical professionals. During the group reflections on their art forms came the following bid for collective action: `the more transparency we?2014 Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 1477-8211 Social Theory Health Vol. 12, 3, 291?12Quinlan et alhave, the more society will become aware and it will set us free’ (participant X, Workshop Transcript #1). As Habermas theorizes, when our capacities for critical reflection are reconstituted, gone are feelings of powerlessness, passivity and incompetence in thinking and speaking about issues that are ordinarily the purview of experts. Contrary to the usual expectations of research ethics boards, the core group did not want their privacy protected. They discussed, argued and proposed, and eventually agreed that putting a name to each of their faces would make the condition of lymphedema more real. Avasimibe mechanism of action Reflecting back on those initial workshops, a core group member commented, `there needs to be a voice and there were some pretty good voices there [in the workshops] and collectively it was quite clear, quite loud’ (A#3). Their newfound collective voice enabled the women to speak their truthfulness to power in the form of the ethnodrama, a voice they found through the workshops’ expressive art forms. Consolidating `lay’ knowledge The medical information the women had acquired before taking part in the study was limited by ambiguity. As A#4 stated, `it’s frustrating with the lymphedema because you go and LDN193189MedChemExpress LDN193189 there’s not a lot of help or a lot of information so, but and what I’ve tried in the past lots of times doesn’t help me’. Another offered the following: `You’re trying to find out, if you, because you don’t feel satisfied with your knowledge, you’re always seeking and then sometimes you get stuff told to you that’s really not accurate. And then you have to figure out if that’s true’. The women continually expressed their frustrations around living with a condition that is not well understood and for which there are no treatment guidelines or best practices. The women’s art forms propelled them to go beyond what they knew and to share, assess and validate new knowledge with others. Over the course of the study, they came to realize that the scientific facts concerning lymphedema are still in the making and controversies abound. Rather than verifiable generalizable findings, what scientific knowledge should deliver, they found seemingly arbitrary causes and consequences of lymphedema. Like others with chronic conditions, the women looked to medical `expert’ knowledge to help keep the condition as an object distinct from the self (Aujoulat et al, 2008). In its absence, the women turned to their day-to-day experiences with the condition as alternative sources of understanding. In contrast to the women’s interactions with physicians, described as undermining and intimidating, in the exchanges within the group contributions were valued, power was shared and listening was active. `If you’re having a conversation in a doctor’s office and have questions, it’s a whole different feel than when we were sitting in our conference [read: workshop] and asking306 ?2014 Macmillan Publi.Nt the disturbing, frightening, mystifying discourse of medical reports. In the second stage of the project, during which the ethnodrama was performed, the concentric domains of the shared lifeworld extended to audiences comprising health-care providers. Early in the group’s development, the seven women expressed their collective need to enlighten medical professionals. During the group reflections on their art forms came the following bid for collective action: `the more transparency we?2014 Macmillan Publishers Ltd. 1477-8211 Social Theory Health Vol. 12, 3, 291?12Quinlan et alhave, the more society will become aware and it will set us free’ (participant X, Workshop Transcript #1). As Habermas theorizes, when our capacities for critical reflection are reconstituted, gone are feelings of powerlessness, passivity and incompetence in thinking and speaking about issues that are ordinarily the purview of experts. Contrary to the usual expectations of research ethics boards, the core group did not want their privacy protected. They discussed, argued and proposed, and eventually agreed that putting a name to each of their faces would make the condition of lymphedema more real. Reflecting back on those initial workshops, a core group member commented, `there needs to be a voice and there were some pretty good voices there [in the workshops] and collectively it was quite clear, quite loud’ (A#3). Their newfound collective voice enabled the women to speak their truthfulness to power in the form of the ethnodrama, a voice they found through the workshops’ expressive art forms. Consolidating `lay’ knowledge The medical information the women had acquired before taking part in the study was limited by ambiguity. As A#4 stated, `it’s frustrating with the lymphedema because you go and there’s not a lot of help or a lot of information so, but and what I’ve tried in the past lots of times doesn’t help me’. Another offered the following: `You’re trying to find out, if you, because you don’t feel satisfied with your knowledge, you’re always seeking and then sometimes you get stuff told to you that’s really not accurate. And then you have to figure out if that’s true’. The women continually expressed their frustrations around living with a condition that is not well understood and for which there are no treatment guidelines or best practices. The women’s art forms propelled them to go beyond what they knew and to share, assess and validate new knowledge with others. Over the course of the study, they came to realize that the scientific facts concerning lymphedema are still in the making and controversies abound. Rather than verifiable generalizable findings, what scientific knowledge should deliver, they found seemingly arbitrary causes and consequences of lymphedema. Like others with chronic conditions, the women looked to medical `expert’ knowledge to help keep the condition as an object distinct from the self (Aujoulat et al, 2008). In its absence, the women turned to their day-to-day experiences with the condition as alternative sources of understanding. In contrast to the women’s interactions with physicians, described as undermining and intimidating, in the exchanges within the group contributions were valued, power was shared and listening was active. `If you’re having a conversation in a doctor’s office and have questions, it’s a whole different feel than when we were sitting in our conference [read: workshop] and asking306 ?2014 Macmillan Publi.

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