The discovery of Project Fa de. The monstrous portrayal of plastic

The discovery of Project Fa de. The monstrous portrayal of plastic surgery within the game serves as an allegory for the progressive commodification of the body/self in late capitalism. For an interesting parallel, see Jones. On Leonardo da Vinci’s Grotesque Heads, see: Clark, 120?4; Gombrich; and Clayton. The conversation took place on 7 Dec. 2009 at the Wellcome Trust, London. Wellcome Library, Archives and Manuscripts RAMC 760. The photographs were taken by Dr Albert Norman, Honorary Scientific Photographer, between 1916 and 1918. The public part of the database is divided into “historical” and “contemporary” images. A third category — clinical images — is password protected and restricted to registered users (mostly doctors, public health officials and medical publishers). Wellcome Images also does specific searches on behalf of commercial clients. Where a patient can be identified, their permission is required before a photograph can be published. Catherine TGR-1202 site Draycott, email correspondence, 17 Dec. 2009. “Project Fa de vs BioShock?” not_john_galt, 19 July 2007, 1.23 pm. That BioShock deals in “moral grey areas” is a claim made repeatedly in reviews and publicity. In a preview on Yahoo Games, for example, Ken Levine promises “plenty of moral ambiguity. . . . We wanted a different system than the typical dark side/light side thing. . . . For us, it’s all grey side”, 3 July 2007. http://videogames.yahoo.com/ printview_feature?eid=523932 (accessed 1 Dec. 2009).M E D I C A L A R C H I V E S A N D D I G I TA L C U L T U R E34 35 36 37″Project Fa de vs BioShock?” Nias Wolf, 19 July 2007, 12:44 am. “Project Fa de vs BioShock?” Nias Wolf, 19 July 2007, 01:03 am. The lecture can be downloaded from the GDC website. The distressed breathing is at 32:20?3:35. Bioshock Making Of (view from 5:50): http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=FQ7YT8Ajr0c (retrieved 8 Feb. 11). Interestingly, the Science Museum in London does take account of “cultural objections or taboos surrounding the representation of remains, as well as the display of remains themselves.” However, this sensitivity extends only to images of Lumicitabine biological activity non-European remains. http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/about_us/ about_the_museum/collections/human_remains/human_remains_policy.aspx (accessed 8 Feb. 2011).Works citedBamji, A. “Facial Surgery: The Patient’s Experience.” Facing Armageddon: The First World War Experience. Ed. H. Cecil and P.H. Liddle. London: Leo Cooper, 1996. 490?01. Barker, P. Toby’s Room. London: Hamish Hamilton, 2012. Bell, J. “The Cunning of Francis Bacon.” The New York Review of Books 54.8 (10 May 2007). Web. 8 Feb. 2011. . Biernoff, S. “Flesh Poems: Henry Tonks and the Art of Surgery.” Visual Culture in Britain 11.1 (2010): 25?7. Biernoff, S. “The Rhetoric of Disfigurement in First World War Britain.” Social History of Medicine, doi: 10.1093/shm/hkq095 (2011): 1?0. Bourke, J. Dismembering the Male: Men’s Bodies, Britain and the Great War. London: Reaktion, 1996. Brink, C. “Secular Icons: Looking at Photographs from Nazi Concentration Camps.” History and Memory 12.1 (2000): 135?0. Clark, K. Leonardo da Vinci. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1989 [1939]. Clayton, M. Leonardo da Vinci: The Divine and the Grotesque. Exhibition catalogue. London: Royal Collection Enterprises, 2002. Cross, K., and J. Peck. “Editorial: Special Issue on Photography, Archive and Memory.” Photographies 3.2 (2010): 127?8. Gillies, H.D. Plastic Surgery of the Face based on Selec.The discovery of Project Fa de. The monstrous portrayal of plastic surgery within the game serves as an allegory for the progressive commodification of the body/self in late capitalism. For an interesting parallel, see Jones. On Leonardo da Vinci’s Grotesque Heads, see: Clark, 120?4; Gombrich; and Clayton. The conversation took place on 7 Dec. 2009 at the Wellcome Trust, London. Wellcome Library, Archives and Manuscripts RAMC 760. The photographs were taken by Dr Albert Norman, Honorary Scientific Photographer, between 1916 and 1918. The public part of the database is divided into “historical” and “contemporary” images. A third category — clinical images — is password protected and restricted to registered users (mostly doctors, public health officials and medical publishers). Wellcome Images also does specific searches on behalf of commercial clients. Where a patient can be identified, their permission is required before a photograph can be published. Catherine Draycott, email correspondence, 17 Dec. 2009. “Project Fa de vs BioShock?” not_john_galt, 19 July 2007, 1.23 pm. That BioShock deals in “moral grey areas” is a claim made repeatedly in reviews and publicity. In a preview on Yahoo Games, for example, Ken Levine promises “plenty of moral ambiguity. . . . We wanted a different system than the typical dark side/light side thing. . . . For us, it’s all grey side”, 3 July 2007. http://videogames.yahoo.com/ printview_feature?eid=523932 (accessed 1 Dec. 2009).M E D I C A L A R C H I V E S A N D D I G I TA L C U L T U R E34 35 36 37″Project Fa de vs BioShock?” Nias Wolf, 19 July 2007, 12:44 am. “Project Fa de vs BioShock?” Nias Wolf, 19 July 2007, 01:03 am. The lecture can be downloaded from the GDC website. The distressed breathing is at 32:20?3:35. Bioshock Making Of (view from 5:50): http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=FQ7YT8Ajr0c (retrieved 8 Feb. 11). Interestingly, the Science Museum in London does take account of “cultural objections or taboos surrounding the representation of remains, as well as the display of remains themselves.” However, this sensitivity extends only to images of non-European remains. http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/about_us/ about_the_museum/collections/human_remains/human_remains_policy.aspx (accessed 8 Feb. 2011).Works citedBamji, A. “Facial Surgery: The Patient’s Experience.” Facing Armageddon: The First World War Experience. Ed. H. Cecil and P.H. Liddle. London: Leo Cooper, 1996. 490?01. Barker, P. Toby’s Room. London: Hamish Hamilton, 2012. Bell, J. “The Cunning of Francis Bacon.” The New York Review of Books 54.8 (10 May 2007). Web. 8 Feb. 2011. . Biernoff, S. “Flesh Poems: Henry Tonks and the Art of Surgery.” Visual Culture in Britain 11.1 (2010): 25?7. Biernoff, S. “The Rhetoric of Disfigurement in First World War Britain.” Social History of Medicine, doi: 10.1093/shm/hkq095 (2011): 1?0. Bourke, J. Dismembering the Male: Men’s Bodies, Britain and the Great War. London: Reaktion, 1996. Brink, C. “Secular Icons: Looking at Photographs from Nazi Concentration Camps.” History and Memory 12.1 (2000): 135?0. Clark, K. Leonardo da Vinci. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1989 [1939]. Clayton, M. Leonardo da Vinci: The Divine and the Grotesque. Exhibition catalogue. London: Royal Collection Enterprises, 2002. Cross, K., and J. Peck. “Editorial: Special Issue on Photography, Archive and Memory.” Photographies 3.2 (2010): 127?8. Gillies, H.D. Plastic Surgery of the Face based on Selec.

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