Powerful others (range 636, each subscale). Aggressive medical management preferences After providing

Powerful others (range 636, each subscale). Aggressive medical management preferences After providing information regarding CYC and clinical trials, agreement with the following Win 63843 web statements was measured: `If my lupus becomes more severe, seriously attacking my lung, heart, kidney or brain and if my doctor recommended it, then I would be willing to receive cyclophosphamide’ and `If my lupus gets worse and if my doctor recommended it, then I would be willing to participate in a lupus research clinical trial that may involve the use of a new, experimental medication.’ Measures of familiarity with CYC treatment (range 03), as well as perceptions of risk (range 315) and effectiveness (range 630) of CYC treatment are based on previously used measures pertaining to joint replacement surgery [9, 10] but were modified to reflect CYC administration in lupus patients. Setting, role preferences and experienceMethodsThis cross-sectional study utilized the model of Bowling and Ebrahim [6] and followed the strategies of Ibrahim et al. [10] and Suarez-Almazor et al. [9], who conducted a series of studies to determine the factors most important to racial and ethnic differences in joint replacement surgery. Confidentiality was maintained by assigning participant numbers RG7800 custom synthesis instead of using participant names on survey and evaluation forms. We obtained institutional review board approval (University of Chicago IRB Protocol #16912A) and participants’ informed consent.ParticipantsAll patients who received their usual lupus care in the University of Chicago Rheumatology Clinic were recruitedParticipants were asked whether they preferred seeing a rheumatologist of their own race, sex or approximate age. Patient perceived physician participatorywww.rheumatology.oxfordjournals.orgTreatment preferences in lupusFIG. 1 SLE patients recruited.SLE patients considered for participation (n = 235)Patients excluded (n =30) ?Race/ethnicity other than African-American or white (n = 13) ?Participated in RCT and received CYC (n= 11) ?Did not meet ACR criteria for SLE (n =4) ?Severe cognitive dysfunction (n = 2)Patients refused to participate (n =10)SLE patients consented (n=195)Patients removed from analysis (n = 13) ?Not successfully contacted (n = 10) ?Declined to complete the majority of survey (n =3)SLE patients analysed (n = 182) ?African-American (n = 120) ?White (n= 62)decision-making (PDM) style [15] (range 0100) and duration of physicianpatient relationship were measured. Trust in physicians was determined using Hall’s Trust in Physicians Scale [16] (range 1155) as well as patient perceived discrimination [17] (range 420). Disease context Standardized measures were used to assess disease severity during the telephone interviews and chart abstraction. These measures included the SLEDAI [18], SLICC Damage Index [19], Charlson Comorbidity Index [20], number/type of major immunosuppressants used and disease duration.Reliability and validity testsThe reliability and validity of several of the measures used have never been tested in lupus patients. Other measures were also modified from the original forms. Hence the following reliability and validity tests were conducted. The Cronbach a coefficient formula was used to test the internal consistency of survey components with multiple items. An internal consistency reliability score of 50.70 was considered ideal. To confirm the number of dimensions underlying the different set of multi-item variables compared, confirmatory fact.Powerful others (range 636, each subscale). Aggressive medical management preferences After providing information regarding CYC and clinical trials, agreement with the following statements was measured: `If my lupus becomes more severe, seriously attacking my lung, heart, kidney or brain and if my doctor recommended it, then I would be willing to receive cyclophosphamide’ and `If my lupus gets worse and if my doctor recommended it, then I would be willing to participate in a lupus research clinical trial that may involve the use of a new, experimental medication.’ Measures of familiarity with CYC treatment (range 03), as well as perceptions of risk (range 315) and effectiveness (range 630) of CYC treatment are based on previously used measures pertaining to joint replacement surgery [9, 10] but were modified to reflect CYC administration in lupus patients. Setting, role preferences and experienceMethodsThis cross-sectional study utilized the model of Bowling and Ebrahim [6] and followed the strategies of Ibrahim et al. [10] and Suarez-Almazor et al. [9], who conducted a series of studies to determine the factors most important to racial and ethnic differences in joint replacement surgery. Confidentiality was maintained by assigning participant numbers instead of using participant names on survey and evaluation forms. We obtained institutional review board approval (University of Chicago IRB Protocol #16912A) and participants’ informed consent.ParticipantsAll patients who received their usual lupus care in the University of Chicago Rheumatology Clinic were recruitedParticipants were asked whether they preferred seeing a rheumatologist of their own race, sex or approximate age. Patient perceived physician participatorywww.rheumatology.oxfordjournals.orgTreatment preferences in lupusFIG. 1 SLE patients recruited.SLE patients considered for participation (n = 235)Patients excluded (n =30) ?Race/ethnicity other than African-American or white (n = 13) ?Participated in RCT and received CYC (n= 11) ?Did not meet ACR criteria for SLE (n =4) ?Severe cognitive dysfunction (n = 2)Patients refused to participate (n =10)SLE patients consented (n=195)Patients removed from analysis (n = 13) ?Not successfully contacted (n = 10) ?Declined to complete the majority of survey (n =3)SLE patients analysed (n = 182) ?African-American (n = 120) ?White (n= 62)decision-making (PDM) style [15] (range 0100) and duration of physicianpatient relationship were measured. Trust in physicians was determined using Hall’s Trust in Physicians Scale [16] (range 1155) as well as patient perceived discrimination [17] (range 420). Disease context Standardized measures were used to assess disease severity during the telephone interviews and chart abstraction. These measures included the SLEDAI [18], SLICC Damage Index [19], Charlson Comorbidity Index [20], number/type of major immunosuppressants used and disease duration.Reliability and validity testsThe reliability and validity of several of the measures used have never been tested in lupus patients. Other measures were also modified from the original forms. Hence the following reliability and validity tests were conducted. The Cronbach a coefficient formula was used to test the internal consistency of survey components with multiple items. An internal consistency reliability score of 50.70 was considered ideal. To confirm the number of dimensions underlying the different set of multi-item variables compared, confirmatory fact.

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